PASSING STONES TVOS 1440P (LAPTOP)

Published on March 11, 2020, 9:15 pm — Comedy


Passing Stones

 

 

All the stones I have passed since this Monday, 11/4. The day I took my stents out. I had a 5mm stone retrieved from my left ureter and lithotripsy on a 2.5cm staghorn calculi in my right kidney on 10/21 and have had the stents and been passing stones since. Hi guys, I'm about 2 weeks into having a stent, after laser fragmentation of a 12m stone lodged in the top of my ureter. I have the same procedure scheduled again next week to make sure there are no remaining stones. My pain settled down after about 5 days but then last few days ive noticed I'm passing small, really hard fragments. Do you think this is something to worry about? My guess is it's bits of what they broke up that's finally made it out. Residual pain after passing stone (1 mm. This is my second stone, had one when I was very young (5 maybe? Very scary painful experience for me back then. Anyways a couple days ago I had kidney pain off and on, nothing horrid but it was sharp and very uncomfortable for 10-60 seconds at a time. Probably happened 8-10x during the day. Pain stopped last night and I noticed some mild side cramps, nothing that made me to uncomfortable or lasted more than 2-3 jabs over the evening. Now today I have been 100% pain free until about half an hou.

Urine flow improved, still frequency. but I did NOT pass stone. Im a male, any ideas whats happening or where stone might be? I think I can feel it in urethra. Caught this film at the Arizona International Film Festival. I wasn't expecting a lot (though the festival's director told me it was one of the best films submitted. Five minutes into it I was sold. Shot in B & W on a shoestring budget, this film is hilarious. The acting is solid, the writing is solid and the look of the film is solid. The acting is probably the biggest revelation, since most films shot on low budgets tend to have amateur or stagey acting. Not this one. It features one of the most convincing, endearing and funny portrayals of a character with Tourette's Syndrome I've ever seen. The plot is convoluted without being confusing and raunchy without being gratuitous. If you get the chance, see this movie. Filmmakers like Majkowski (hope I got that right) deserve the chance to strut their stuff to a wider audience.

Still in pain after passing stones.

 

 


 

Wow. amy lee is a voice i haven't heard in a long time. So I was reading the description and I saw a word Fallen then I heard Amy lee singing. Amy lee fallen that sound familiar right. I've got my 2nd stone now... 7mm one I named Rocky.

 

This movie was we todd did. Valar Morghulis. I've had a few,but the last one was the size of a I hit the ER,the nurse looked at me and asked if I had a kidney stone(apparently she had one before and knew what it was like) took me back and had the IV installed and asked-morphine or dilluaded.I said morphine,they gave it to me and she returned 15 minutes later and saidthat didn't do anything for you did it? I said no and she gave me dillauded on top of the morphine.I don't remember her name,but I love her.

Never had dont ever want one. He hit the nail on the head. Kidney stones hurt So Bad. I've had so many (stop counting at 100. that I now how permanent damage. I'm one of those rare cases that develop both uric acid and calcium stones. Changed my diet, took the the meds. Still get them. Now have only one functioning kidney. Milla is epic. LMAO. 🤣😂🤣😂 So damn true.

Doctor: Once we get it out we'll put a stent in that clog. Me: Stop talking.

 

 

 


 

 

This Joel Osteen documentary is amazing. Is anyone else just in awe of Amy Lee's voice in this? I've missed it. I think i just saw the whole movie... LOl. Amy Lee❤. @VichhayDraws okay thanks. Muuulti-paassss... A minute and 22 seconds in and I am already LAUGHING myself silly.

I admire Norton but DeNiro is FUCKIN LEGEND

Something, something, something. khaleesi. something, something, something.

 

 

 

 


 

 


Reporter: Bob Hannent
Resume Short attention span, always looking for inspiration. Designs technology things but don't ask me to build them. Constantly learning and happy to share.

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Public Full Hd Passing stonesthrow. Public full hd passing stones without. Public full hd passing stones video. Public full hd passing stones movie. Public full hd passing stones quotes. The goal of this blog is to provide insight into the process of passing a kidney stone. In particular, we will address what you should expect at each of the four stages along the way. For the newbies, kidney stones can be one of the most frightening experiences of a person’s life. The pain starts almost immediately out of nowhere and typically generates significant panic for the person experiencing the pain. The pain is so great that it commonly elicits a ride in an ambulance or a middle of the night emergency trip to the ER. Either way, not a ton of fun. To make matters worse, Hospital staff don’t always know what’s happening to you and provide very little useful advice. Even after they have identified that it’s a kidney stone, very little is communicated. And trust me, this comes from first-hand experience over multiple kidney stones. It is nothing short of shocking to learn about the lack of education for a condition that impacts over 1 in 10 Americans. So, let’s dive in. Stage One Most people first become aware that there is an issue when the kidney stone begins the process of detaching from the inner wall of your kidneys where it has been forming. The actual growth process of the stone is painless, and most people do not know that it’s occurring. The only exception to this is if the stone creates a blockage of some sort that starts to impact kidney function, which would exhibit other symptoms. However, this is rare. Once the stone starts to detach from the interior of the kidney, the body recognizes a foreign object and begins the process of trying to remove it. This process results in waves of agonizing pain as the kidney spasms to try and shake loose the offending object. *NOTE: for me, this pain feels like the worst pulled muscle OR if you pulled your back severely. Spasm frequency will differ for everyone. But, count on one probably 1-4+ times an hour until your kidney has shaken itself free from the kidney stone. These spasms are often debilitating. Like, take your breath away intense. No matter how tough you are or resilient to pain, it has the potential to bring you to your knees. Pregnant women often comment that the pain of kidney stones is worse than giving birth naturally. Now that is crazy! Nevertheless, one ray of sunshine in all of this is that the pain found in Stage One is, in most instances, the worst of the entire process of passing a kidney stone. Stage Two Once the kidney stone leaves the physical kidney itself, it will now be traveling down the path of your ureter. Ureters are the tubules that carry urine from the kidneys down to the bladder (see Figure A). The trouble is, the average human ureter is roughly 3-4mm in exterior diameter (interior diameter is about 2-3mm) and about 10-12 inches long. Kidney stones can range in size considerably. But, anything over 2mm, you’re going to feel. Now, the pain is not nearly as bad as when the kidney stone detaches from the kidney. But let’s be clear. There is still a lot of pain. However, the pain only comes when the stone is moving. And, the pain is different in sensation. In Stage One, the pain is INTENSE and feels like nuclear bombs going off. Pain in Stage Two is more of a radiating sensation, which makes sense because the stone is ripping and tearing as it makes its way down to your bladder. You may also feel a sensation of pressure occurring near where the kidney stone might have stopped at this stage. It’s not entirely uncomfortable. But, you know something is there. Stage Three Once in your bladder, things change pretty dramatically when it comes to pain. The pain is pretty much gone. But, what you are going to feel is IMMENSE PRESSURE. And, your body is going to make you feel like you have to pee every 5 minutes. But, this makes sense, the body is pretty smart, and it knows that there is a foreign object somewhere in your urinary tract, and it wants it gone. What you’re about to experience is a bit like playing with one of those Yomega Brain yo-yos that will sit and spin at the end of your throw and then snap back up after a few seconds (does anyone else remember those things?? ). What I mean is this: Inevitably, you will respond to your body’s signal to urinate, and the stone is going to get stuck in the entrance to your urethra as you try to pass it (your urethra is the channel from the bladder to the outside world). NOTE: This game is going to be VERY disconcerting for any first-time kidney stone sufferers out there. Once that stone gets stuck, and the urine flow goes away, panic sets in all over again. You will say to yourself, “Shoot, now it’s stuck. Do I have to go to the Emergency Room again?!? UGH! ” However, rest assured. Give it 5-10 minutes, and the kidney stone will return to the bladder, and you will start the process all over again. However, after reading or watching this, you will be able to out-smart that kidney stone:) Stage Four This last stage is going to feel a bit counter-intuitive to some of you out there. But, it is super important to follow the advice. Once you feel the kidney stone lodge itself in the opening to your urethra, you have to PUSH. And, push hard. Keep pushing until you hear the stone plink on the bowl of your toilet or thwack into your plastic strainer. If you would like to learn more about the four things that you can do to make this process a ton easier, please watch or read our post on the 4 Keys to Passing Kidney Stones Naturally. This content will help you prepare yourself for success and skip a lot of the agony that is associated with passing a kidney stone.

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Public full hd passing stones vs. Public full hd passing stones videos. Public full hd passing stones 2016. Public Full Hd Passing stones cry. Source: Getty Images Kidney stone facts A kidney stone is a hard, crystalline mineral material formed within the kidney or urinary tract. Nephrolithiasis is the medical term for kidney stones. One in every 20 people develops kidney stones at some point in their life. Kidney stones form when there is a decrease in urine volume and/or an excess of stone-forming substances in the urine. Dehydration is a major risk factor for kidney stone formation. Symptoms of a kidney stone include flank pain (the pain can be quite severe) and blood in the urine ( hematuria). People with certain medical conditions, such as gout, and those who take certain medications or supplements are at risk for kidney stones. Diet and hereditary factors are also related to stone formation. Diagnosis of kidney stones is best accomplished using an ultrasound, intravenous pyleography (IVP), or a CT scan. Most kidney stones will pass through the ureter to the bladder on their own with time. Treatment includes pain-control medications and, in some cases, medications to facilitate the passage of urine. If needed, lithotripsy or surgical techniques may be used for stones which do not pass through the ureter to the bladder on their own. Kidney Stone Treatment Most kidney stones eventually pass from the kidney through the ureter and bladder and finally through the urethra on their own. However, treatment is often required for pain control from kidney stones as they pass. The consumption of ample fluids helps facilitate the passage of kidney stones, but even with plentiful fluid intake, most people require some type of medications for pain control. Source: MedicineNet What is a kidney stone (nephrolithiasis)? A kidney stone is a hard, crystalline mineral material formed within the kidney or urinary tract. Kidney stones are a common cause of blood in the urine (hematuria) and often severe pain in the abdomen, flank, or groin. Kidney stones are sometimes called renal calculi. The condition of having kidney stones is termed nephrolithiasis. Having stones at any location in the urinary tract is referred to as urolithiasis, and the term ureterolithiasis is used to refer to stones located in the ureters. Who is at risk for kidney stones? Anyone may develop a kidney stone, but people with certain diseases and conditions (see below) or those who are taking certain medications are more susceptible to their development. Urinary tract stones are more common in men than in women. Most urinary stones develop in people 20 to 49 years of age, and those who are prone to multiple attacks of kidney stones usually develop their first stones during the second or third decade of life. People who have already had more than one kidney stone are prone to developing further stones. In residents of industrialized countries, kidney stones are more common than stones in the bladder. The opposite is true for residents of developing areas of the world, where bladder stones are the most common. This difference is believed to be related to dietary factors. People who live in the southern or southwestern regions of the U. S. have a higher rate of kidney stone formation, possibly due to inadequate water intake leading to dehydration, than those living in other areas. Over the last few decades, the percentage of people with kidney stones in the U. has been increasing, most likely related to the obesity epidemic. A family history of kidney stones is also a risk factor for developing kidney stones. Kidney stones are more common in Asians and Caucasians than in Native Americans, Africans, or African Americans. Uric acid kidney stones are more common in people with chronically elevated uric acid levels in their blood ( hyperuricemia). A small number of pregnant women develop kidney stones, and there is some evidence that pregnancy -related changes may increase the risk of stone formation. Factors that may contribute to stone formation during pregnancy include a slowing of the passage of urine due to increased progesterone levels and diminished fluid intake due to a decreasing bladder capacity from the enlarging uterus. Healthy pregnant women also have a mild increase in their urinary calcium excretion. However, it remains unclear whether the changes of pregnancy are directly responsible for kidney stone formation or if these women have another underlying factor that predisposes them to kidney stone formation. SLIDESHOW Kidney Stones: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment See Slideshow Source: N/A What causes kidney stones? Kidney stones form when there is a decrease in urine volume and/or an excess of stone-forming substances in the urine. The most common type of kidney stone contains calcium in combination with either oxalate or phosphate. A majority of kidney stones are calcium stones. Other chemical compounds that can form stones in the urinary tract include uric acid, magnesium ammonium phosphate (which forms struvite stones; see below), and the amino acid cysteine. Dehydration from reduced fluid intake or strenuous exercise without adequate fluid replacement increases the risk of kidney stones. Obstruction to the flow of urine can also lead to stone formation. In this regard, climate may be a risk factor for kidney stone development, since residents of hot and dry areas are more likely to become dehydrated and susceptible to stone formation. Kidney stones can also result from infection in the urinary tract. These are known as struvite or infection stones. Metabolic abnormalities, including inherited disorders of metabolism, can alter the composition of the urine and increase an individual's risk of stone formation. Source: iStock Other medical conditions which cause kidney stones A number of different medical conditions can lead to an increased risk for developing kidney stones: Gout results in chronically increased amount of uric acid in the blood and urine and can lead to the formation of uric acid kidney stones. Hypercalciuria (high calcium in the urine), another inherited condition, causes stones in more than half of cases. In this condition, too much calcium is absorbed from food and excreted into the urine, where it may form calcium phosphate or calcium oxalate kidney stones. Other conditions associated with an increased risk of kidney stones include hyperparathyroidism, kidney diseases such as renal tubular acidosis, and other inherited metabolic conditions, including cystinuria and hyperoxaluria. Chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure ( hypertension) are also associated with an increased risk of developing kidney stones. People with inflammatory bowel disease are also more likely to develop kidney stones. Those who have undergone intestinal bypass or ostomy surgery are also at increased risk for kidney stones. Some medications also raise the risk of kidney stones. These medications include some diuretics, calcium-containing antacids, and the protease inhibitor indinavir ( Crixivan), a drug used to treat HIV infection. Dietary factors and practices may increase the risk of stone formation in susceptible individuals. In particular, inadequate fluid intake predisposes to dehydration, which is a major risk factor for stone formation. Other dietary practices that may increase an individual's risk of forming kidney stones include a high intake of animal protein, a high-salt diet, excessive sugar consumption, excessive vitamin D supplementation, and excessive intake of oxalate-containing foods such as spinach. Interestingly, low levels of dietary calcium intake may alter the calcium-oxalate balance and result in the increased excretion of oxalate and a propensity to form oxalate stones. Hyperoxaluria as an inherited condition is uncommon and is known as primary hyperoxaluria. The elevated levels of oxalate in the urine increase the risk of stone formation. Primary hyperoxaluria is much less common than hyperoxaluria due to dietary factors as mentioned above. What are the early signs and symptoms of kidney stones? While some kidney stones may not produce symptoms (known as "silent" stones), people who have kidney stones often report the sudden onset of excruciating, cramping pain in their low back and/or side, groin, or abdomen. Changes in body position do not relieve this pain. The abdominal, groin, and/or back pain typically waxes and wanes in severity, characteristic of colicky pain (the pain is sometimes referred to as renal colic). It may be so severe that it is often accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The pain has been described by many as the worst pain of their lives, even worse than the pain of childbirth or broken bones. Kidney stones also characteristically cause bloody urine. If infection is present in the urinary tract along with the stones, there may be fever and chills. Sometimes, symptoms such as difficulty urinating, urinary urgency, penile pain, or testicular pain may occur due to kidney stones. How are kidney stones diagnosed? The diagnosis of kidney stones is suspected when the typical pattern of symptoms is noted and when other possible causes of the abdominal or flank pain are excluded. Which is the ideal test to diagnose kidney stones is controversial. Imaging tests are usually done to confirm the diagnosis. Many patients who go to the emergency room will have a non-contrast CT scan done. This can be done rapidly and will help rule out other causes for flank or abdominal pain. However, a CT scan exposes patients to significant radiation, and recently, ultrasound in combination with plain abdominal X-rays have been shown to be effective in diagnosing kidney stones. In pregnant women or those who should avoid radiation exposure, an ultrasound examination may be done to help establish the diagnosis. What is the treatment for kidney stones? How long does it take to pass a kidney stone? Most kidney stones eventually pass through the urinary tract on their own within 48 hours, with ample fluid intake. Ketorolac ( Toradol), an injectable anti-inflammatory drug, and narcotics may be used for pain control when over-the-counter pain control medications are not effective. Toradol, aspirin, and NSAIDs must be avoided if lithotripsy is to be done because of the increased risk of bleeding or if there is impaired kidney function. Intravenous pain medications can be given when nausea and vomiting are present. Although there are no proven home remedies to dissolve kidney stones, home treatment may be considered for patients who have a known history of kidney stones. Since most kidney stones, given time, will pass through the ureter to the bladder on their own, treatment is directed toward control of symptoms. Home care in this case includes the consumption of plenty of fluids. Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) may be used as pain medication if there is no contraindication to its use. If further pain medication is needed, stronger narcotic pain medications may be recommended. There are several factors that influence the ability to pass a stone. These include the size of the person, prior stone passage, prostate enlargement, pregnancy, and the size of the stone. A 4 mm stone has an 80% chance of passage while a 5 mm stone has a 20% chance. Stones larger than 9 mm to 10 mm rarely pass without specific treatment. Some medications have been used to increase the passage rates of kidney stones. These include calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia, Afeditab, Nifediac) and alpha blockers such as tamsulosin ( Flomax). These drugs may be prescribed to some people who have stones that do not rapidly pass through the urinary tract. For kidney stones that do not pass on their own, a procedure called lithotripsy is often used. In this procedure, shock waves are used to break up a large stone into smaller pieces that can then pass through the urinary system. Surgical techniques have also been developed to remove kidney stones when other treatment methods are not effective. This may be done through a small incision in the skin (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or through an instrument known as an ureteroscope passed through the urethra and bladder up into the ureter. Subscribe to MedicineNet's General Health Newsletter By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time. Can kidney stones be prevented? Rather than having to undergo treatment, it is best to avoid kidney stones in the first place when possible. It can be especially helpful to drink more water, since low fluid intake and dehydration are major risk factors for kidney stone formation. Depending on the cause of the kidney stones and an individual's medical history, changes in the diet or medications are sometimes recommended to decrease the likelihood of developing further kidney stones. If one has passed a stone, it can be particularly helpful to have it analyzed in a laboratory to determine the precise type of stone so specific prevention measures can be considered. People who have a tendency to form calcium oxalate kidney stones may be advised to limit their consumption of foods high in oxalate, such as spinach, rhubarb, Swiss chard, beets, wheat germ, and peanuts. Also drinking lemon juice or lemonade may be helpful in preventing kidney stones. What is the prognosis for kidney stones? Most kidney stones will pass on their own, and successful treatments have been developed to remove larger stones or stones that do not pass. People who have had a kidney stone remain at risk for future stones throughout their lives. Are home remedies effective for kidney stones? For some people who have had many kidney stones, home care may be appropriate. When passing a kidney stone, drinking lots of fluid is important. In fact, this is the most important home care measure. Medications may help control the pain (as described previously). However, if it is the first time one has had symptoms suggestive of a kidney stone, it is important to see a doctor right away. Medically Reviewed on 7/12/2019 References Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care REFERENCES: "Kidney Stones in Adults. " National Kidney & Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Sept. 2, 2010. <> Shekarriz, Bijan. "Hyperoxaluria. " Apr. 5, 2013. <>. Wolf Jr., J. Stuart. "Nephrolithiasis. " September 26, 2015. <> CONTINUE SCROLLING FOR RELATED SLIDESHOW.

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