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Watch Free found love. Watch Free foundation. Watch Free found magazine. Watch free foundation. Watch Free found dead. Watch free foundation. Found  1   (found) tr. v. founded, founding, founds 1. To establish or set up, especially with provision for continuing existence: The college was founded in 1872. See Synonyms at establish. 2. To establish the foundation or basis of; base: found a theory on firm evidence. [Middle English founden, from Old French fonder, from Latin fundāre, from fundus, bottom. found  2   (found) tr. To melt (metal) and pour into a mold. To make (objects) by pouring molten material into a mold. [Middle English founden, from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere; see gheu- in Indo-European roots. found  3   (found) v. Past tense and past participle of find. found ( faʊnd) vb the past tense and past participle of find adj 1. (Nautical Terms) furnished, or fitted out: the boat is well found. Brit with meals, heating, bed linen, etc, provided without extra charge (esp in the phrase all found) found ( faʊnd) vb 1. tr) to bring into being, set up, or establish (something, such as an institution, society, etc) 2. tr) to build or establish the foundation or basis of 3. also intr; foll by on or upon) to have a basis (in) depend (on) C13: from Old French fonder, from Latin fundāre, from fundus bottom] found ( faʊnd) vb ( tr) 1. (Metallurgy) to cast (a material, such as metal or glass) by melting and pouring into a mould 2. (Metallurgy) to shape or make (articles) in this way; cast [C14: from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere to melt] found 1 (faʊnd) v. 1. pt. and pp. of find. adj. equipped; outfitted: a new boat, fully found. n. 3. free board and meals. found 2 (faʊnd) v. t. to establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence: to found a new company. to lay the lowest part of (a structure) firmly: a house founded on solid rock. to base; ground: a story founded on fact. 4. to provide a basis for. [1250–1300; Middle English < Old French fonder < Latin fundāre, derivative of fundus bottom] found 3 (faʊnd) v. to melt and pour (metal, glass, etc. into a mold. [1350–1400; Middle English fonden < Middle French fondre to melt, cast < Latin fundere to pour, melt, cast] found Found is the past tense and past participle of find. I found a five-pound note in the gutter. His body has not been found. Found is also a verb. If someone founds a town or an organization, they cause it to be built or to exist. The past tense and past participle of found is founded. Tyndall founded his own publishing company. found Past participle: founded Gerund: founding Imperative found found Present I found you found he/she/it founds we found you found they found Preterite I founded you founded he/she/it founded we founded you founded they founded Present Continuous I am founding you are founding he/she/it is founding we are founding you are founding they are founding Present Perfect I have founded you have founded he/she/it has founded we have founded you have founded they have founded Past Continuous I was founding you were founding he/she/it was founding we were founding you were founding they were founding Past Perfect I had founded you had founded he/she/it had founded we had founded you had founded they had founded Future I will found you will found he/she/it will found we will found you will found they will found Future Perfect I will have founded you will have founded he/she/it will have founded we will have founded you will have founded they will have founded Future Continuous I will be founding you will be founding he/she/it will be founding we will be founding you will be founding they will be founding Present Perfect Continuous I have been founding you have been founding he/she/it has been founding we have been founding you have been founding they have been founding Future Perfect Continuous I will have been founding you will have been founding he/she/it will have been founding we will have been founding you will have been founding they will have been founding Past Perfect Continuous I had been founding you had been founding he/she/it had been founding we had been founding you had been founding they had been founding Conditional I would found you would found he/she/it would found we would found you would found they would found Past Conditional I would have founded you would have founded he/she/it would have founded we would have founded you would have founded they would have founded Thesaurus Antonyms Related Words Synonyms Legend: Noun 1. found - food and lodging provided in addition to money; they worked for 30 and found" pay, remuneration, salary, wage, earnings - something that remunerates; wages were paid by check. he wasted his pay on drink. they saved a quarter of all their earnings" Verb 1. found - set up or found; She set up a literacy program" establish, launch, set up open, open up - start to operate or function or cause to start operating or functioning; open a business" 2. found - set up or lay the groundwork for; establish a new department" institute, establish, plant, constitute initiate, pioneer - take the lead or initiative in; participate in the development of; This South African surgeon pioneered heart transplants" fix - set or place definitely; Let's fix the date for the party. appoint, constitute, name, nominate - create and charge with a task or function; nominate a committee" 3. found - use as a basis for; found on; base a claim on some observation" base, establish, ground build - found or ground; build a defense on nothing but the accused person's reputation" Adj. found - come upon unexpectedly or after searching; found art. the lost-and-found department" saved - rescued; especially from the power and consequences of sin; a saved soul" lost - no longer in your possession or control; unable to be found or recovered; a lost child. lost friends. his lost book. lost opportunities" found verb 1. establish, start, set up, begin, create, institute, organize, construct, constitute, originate, endow, inaugurate, bring into being He founded the Centre for Journalism Studies. found verb 1. To bring into existence formally: 2. To provide a basis for: Translations يُؤسِّس يَقومُ على založit zřídit basere grundlægge oprette perustaa byggja á stofna dibināt izveidot likt pamatus pamatot ustanoviti dayan mak kurmak found [ˈfaʊnd] pt vt. establish) → fonder Baden Powell founded the Scout Movement → Baden Powell a fondé le mouvement scout. found 2 ( faund) verb 1. to start or establish. The school was founded by the king. with on/upon) to base on. The story was founded upon fact. founˈdation noun 1. the act of founding. the foundation of a new university. the base on which something is built. First they laid the foundations, then they built the walls. an amount of money to be used for a special purpose or the organization that manages it. The British Foundation for Cancer Research. ˈfounder noun a person who founds a school, college, organization etc. We commemorate the founder of the school. ˈfounding noun The founding of the organization took place a long time ago. ˈfounding ˈfather noun 1. the first or one of the first founders of an organization, a school of thought etc. the founding father of psychoanalysis. The Founding Fathers of the United States of America were the people who drew up its constitution.

Watch free the founder. Verb past and past participle of find adjective 1 Having been discovered by chance or unexpectedly. 1. 1 (of an object or sound) collected in its natural state and presented in a new context as part of a work of art or piece of music. ‘collages of found photos ‘Sounds that can be used must be generated as found sound by the composer/performer. ‘More than a sonic photo album, this gives an interesting insight on the found sounds used on both albums. ‘Betke was better off when he was digesting found sounds into something murky and nebulous. ‘As the song comes to a close, a mandolin slowly takes over, building a discreet line around a series of found sounds. ‘On the first album, you used a lot of found sounds recorded around the house. ‘Using found musical reference, in a recognisable form is a tricky and perilous business. ‘He was okay, but you've seen found pieces and discarded tat turned into art before. ‘Brady Cranfield had set up a pristine white area to host his collection of found records. 1. 2 (of art) comprising or making use of found objects. 3 (of poetry) formed by taking a piece of non-poetic text and reinterpreting its structure metrically. 2 with submodifier (of a ship) equipped. ‘the ship was well found and seaworthy Pronunciation verb [ with object] 1 Establish or originate (an institution or organization) ‘the monastery was founded in 1665 ‘Berkeley Primary School was founded in 1930, originally as separate infant and junior schools. ‘The club was originally founded in Monasterevin in 1989. ‘The company got its start in 1964 by Bill Ellis, who originally founded the company to publish limited-edition prints. ‘The Royal National Lifeboat Institution was founded. ‘The school was originally founded by Thomas, Earl of Derby in 1509 and stood in what is now the grounds of Blackburn Cathedral. ‘In 1997, she founded the School Leadership Academy, a nonprofit organization that fosters creative educational leadership. ‘It was part of Rolls-Royce, one of the world's largest manufacturers of jet engines, which grew out of the original car-making company founded by Henry Rolls. ‘A company is originally founded by an engineer or scientist with an entrepreneurial streak. ‘He told them, of course, that a colony founded on Quaker principles should not arm itself. ‘The town was formerly a Roman military installation and a Benedictine monastery was founded there in the ninth century. ‘Just as the Apple computer appeared, two researchers founded a company called Adobe and developed the laser printer. ‘His father was once an NU chairman, and his grandfather founded the organization. ‘Winn-Dixie was founded by his grandfather, father and uncles. ‘The association was founded over 15 years ago and has 14 volunteers on a regular basis. ‘Fraternal organizations founded by one group would not admit members of the other groups. ‘The school was founded in May 1969 when Holly Champion was chairman of the education committee. ‘I worked in Vienna in a therapeutic home which was founded by some American Quakers after the war. ‘A gild dedicated to the Virgin Mary was founded there in the early 15th century. ‘The traditional women's organizations drew her support, as did those founded for newer purposes. ‘In the colonial period, a number of major colleges were founded primarily for the purpose of educating clergymen. establish, set up, start, begin, get going, initiate, institute, put in place, form, create, bring into being, launch, float, originate, develop, inaugurate, constitute, endow View synonyms 1. 1 Plan and begin the building of (a settlement) ‘William Penn founded Pennsylvania ‘The whole initial cost of founding the settlement was less than 250, 000, all of which was paid by the settlers. ‘In fact, the settlement was founded by immigrants from Hertfordshire - second and third sons seeking riches in the New World, far from their more fortunate first-born brothers. ‘The settlement was founded in 628BC, and such was its bounding economic success that, within 100 years, seven temples were under construction. ‘It was 1100BC when the Phoenician traders first founded a settlement on a site of the town that now proudly boasts it is the oldest continually inhabited city in western Europe. ‘Scottish immigrants founded a settlement in Dunedin in 1848 with William Cargill as the resident agent. ‘Life in the island goes on almost like it did in the 14th century when the settlement was founded. ‘In the mid-1830s the Kendall settlers gave impetus to the westward movement of Norwegians by founding a settlement in the Fox River area of Illinois. ‘The currently generally accepted view is that this settlement was founded by the Salyes, a culturally homogeneous group by this time, around 190 BC. ‘The Spanish founded several settlements along the coast, and Honduras formed part of the colonial era Captaincy General of Guatemala. ‘In 1565, Spain claimed the Mariana Islands, but a colonial settlement was not founded until 1668. ‘On his return north he founded a settlement known as Kartharpur (the Abode of God) on the western banks of the Ravi river. ‘To the west of the Quay is the Rocks, where the first non-Aboriginal settlement was founded. ‘In 1508 he founded the settlement of Caparra and in 1509 he was made governor. ‘They also introduced many new names as they founded new settlements. ‘During the first summer he founded the settlement at Boston and some thousands of new settlers came in. ‘Industries were established soon after the settlement was founded - a brewery in 1843 and a flax mill, a tannery, solar salt works and a woollen mill by 1845. ‘Diego Velázquez began permanent settlement in 1511, founding Baracoa on the northeastern coast. ‘Not all of the early English settlements were founded entirely as commercial operations, though all of them depended on trade for their livelihood. ‘The Scots who founded the Otago settlement had a great concern with education and from 1858 moves were afoot to build an Athenaeum to contain a reading room, a library and a museum. ‘He was born in the town of St Gallen, which was founded by an Irish monk named Gallus. 2 usually be founded on/upon Base (something) on a particular principle, idea, or feeling. ‘a society founded on the highest principles of religion and education ‘National is terribly clear that we support the idea that this nation is founded on the principle that we are all equal before the law, that we all have equal rights of participation in our Government. ‘It should be a given, based on the principles it was founded on. ‘Like it or not, our society for the most part was founded on a basic principle of freedom of choice. ‘The band was founded on three basic ideas: there would be no designated rehearsal time; in fact, set rehearsals were ‘officially banned. ‘Why, this country was founded on such principles. ‘Her empire is founded on the principle that anything worth doing is worth doing well, and that things done smartly are satisfying to use and joyous to experience. ‘As Tim and others have reminded us at great length, this nation was founded on the principles of the Declaration of Independence. ‘These movies were good because they were founded on an idea: the force. ‘In this, they're denying both the evidence that our justice system does make mistakes, and the very principles it is founded on. ‘Our country was founded on the principle that responsibility comes with rights, not the other way around. ‘I certainly stand by my assertion that the country was not founded on a principle of progressive taxation. ‘What I mean by that is, neither country is founded on some set-the-world-on-fire idea. ‘This is what you get when your rules are not founded on principle. ‘Their world is founded on principles and reasons so different from you, it is heresy you are guilty of, and you will pay. ‘Indeed, it is founded on the idea that there is no definitive solution. ‘The company was founded on the principle that art can be a powerful force. ‘America's democratic republic is founded on the principle that all men are created equal. ‘Many of today's girls' schools are founded on a commercial basis. ‘We suggest that self-effacing humor is founded on the premise of aggression. ‘The very notion of service is founded on the premise that you give more than you get. 2. 1 Serve as a basis for. ‘the company's fortunes are founded on its minerals business ‘Much of the fortune of Dundee was founded on its jute mills and other textile industries, and its jute barons once competed with each other to build grand houses. ‘The Butterfield family was immensely wealthy, their fortune founded on the textile trade. Origin Middle English from Old French fonder, from Latin fundare, from fundus ‘bottom, base. Pronunciation verb [ with object] 1 Melt and mould (metal. 1 Fuse (materials) to make glass. 2 Make (an article) by melting and moulding metal. ‘The double decker bridge, one of only three in New Zealand, was founded on cast iron cylinders sunk into the river bed. Origin Early 16th century from French fondre, from Latin fundere ‘melt, pour. Pronunciation.

Watch free finding nemo. Watch free found footage horror movies. Watch free finding your roots. Watch free found footage movies online. Watch free finders keepers lovers weepers. Watch the founder free online. Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright 2013 by the Philip Lief Group. EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FOUND They arrived at the gate without question or hindrance; but found it fastened. I found him crowned with garlands; for he had been offering sacrifices in the hall. I found the people corrupted; and I must humour their disease. He would not adopt a nameless orphan, found with a poor goatherd of Phelle. Pericles went to seek his son, and found him reclining on the couch where he had left him. This cop that found me in a hallway, he says I must have been give a dose of Peter. It was thus Billy Brue found him at the end of his second day's search. He'd just taken it off the ticker when we found him in Fouts's place there. Here, perchance, may be found a clue in symbol to the family strife. Here, perhaps, may be found the symbolic clue to the strife's cause. RELATED WORDS AND SYNONYMS FOR FOUND base verb build plan or opinion on basing verb build plan or opinion on Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

When night came again I found, with pleasure, that the fire gave light as well as heat and that the discovery of this element was useful to me in my food, for I found some of the offals that the travellers had left had been roasted, and tasted much more savoury than the berries I gathered from the trees. I knew there were three barrels of powder in the ship, but knew not where our gunner had stowed them; but with much search I found them, two of them dry and good, the third had taken water. "With all my heart. said Don Quixote, and reading it aloud as Sancho had requested him, he found it ran thus: And at last, in one of the really air-tight cases, I found a box of matches. She would examine the Lord High Chigglewitz and see which piece of him was next needed, and then hunt around until she found it. When I came to Pate, in hopes of meeting with my associate, I found that he was gone to Mombaza, in hopes of receiving information. As we ascended we found the air grew cooler and cooler, which was a great relief to us, and at dawn, so far as we could judge, we were not more than about a dozen miles from the snow line. With this end in view men and women who were fifty or seventy-five years old would often be found in the night-school. Accordingly, when he had finished his supper, they all went up together to his room and looked through his maps, but the castle was not to be found. Then he fetched other older maps, and they went on looking for the castle until at last they found it, but it was many thousand miles away. Yes, I would find King Arthur's Round Table once more- I had already found it several times- and use it for a base of departure on an exploring tour for my bed; if I could find my bed I could then find my water pitcher; I would quench my raging thirst and turn in. That can only be found in the green country around the Emerald City, and six-leaved clovers are very scarce, even there. I chanced to come here after long wandering, and found a good place to sleep under this tree. Never yet have I found the woman by whom I should like to have children, unless it be this woman whom I love: for I love thee, O Eternity! The next morning we talked of it again, when I found he was fully satisfied, and, smiling, said he hoped I would not want money and not tell him of it, and that I had promised him otherwise. When they came there, and found the men gone, Atkins, who it seems was the forwardest man, called out to his comrade, Ha, Jack, here's the nest, but the birds are flown. They mused a while, to think what should be the occasion of their being gone abroad so soon, and suggested presently that the Spaniards had given them notice of it; and with that they shook hands, and swore to one another that they would be revenged of the Spaniards.

To found something is like laying a "foundation" for a building — note the similarity? But instead of a building, you might found a business or a charity, where you establish the groundwork upon which it can grow. The verb found goes back to the Latin word fundus, meaning "bottom. which in turn led to fundāre, meaning "to lay the bottom of something. If you were to found a library, they might build a statue of you near the entrance. If you're having trouble finding the library, look for a statue with a familiar face.

Watch found footage free. Watch lost and found free online. Watch free movie the founder. Watch free sound. Watch free find true love in charm. Watch found online free. Watch Free found. Top definitions related content examples explore dictionary british verb simple past tense and past participle of find. equipped, outfitted, or furnished: He bought a new boat, fully found. adjective British. provided or furnished without additional charge, as to a tenant; included within the price, rent, etc. (often used postpositively) Room to let, laundry found. noun something that is provided or furnished without charge, especially meals given a domestic: Maid wanted, good salary and found. Words nearby found foulmart, foulmouthed, foulness, fouls, foumart, found, found art, found object, found poem, foundation, foundation day Definition for founded (2 of 3) found 2 verb (used with object) to set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence: to found a new publishing company. to lay the lowest part of (a structure) on a firm base or ground: a house founded on solid rock. to base or ground (usually followed by on or upon) a story founded on fact. to provide a basis or ground for. Origin of found 2 1250–1300; Middle English founden < Old French fonder < Latin fundāre, derivative of fundus bottom, foundation Definition for founded (3 of 3) found 3 verb (used with object) to melt and pour (metal, glass, etc. into a mold. to form or make (an article) of molten material in a mold; cast. Origin of found 3 1350–1400; Middle English fonden < Middle French fondre to melt, cast < Latin fundere to pour, melt, cast Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2020 Examples from the Web for founded EURO was founded by David Duke, the ex-Klansman who ran for Louisiana governor in 1991. The United States was not founded as a Christian nation, no matter how many zealots wish it had been. Founded by German monks in present-day Old Town Stockholm, Zum Franziskaner has become a legend amongst locals and tourists. The man—a Democrat—who founded the Carlyle Group explains why he gives it away. But the company, founded in the late 1980s, is no stranger to media attention. All attempt at concealment implies some practice of the opposite, or undivine science, founded on nescience. What a blow this was to all her rising hopes, founded on the fact of his having shown anxiety to find them out. To the town which was there founded he gave the name of Olinda. Then in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, as the cultivation of science became more general, royal academies were founded. He was the father of General Gordon Cloyd and they founded a long line of honorable citizens in our country. British Dictionary definitions for founded (1 of 3) found 1 verb the past tense and past participle of find adjective furnished, or fitted out the boat is well found British with meals, heating, bed linen, etc, provided without extra charge (esp in the phrase all found) British Dictionary definitions for founded (2 of 3) found 2 verb (tr) to bring into being, set up, or establish (something, such as an institution, society, etc) tr) to build or establish the foundation or basis of (also intr; foll by on or upon) to have a basis (in) depend (on) Word Origin for found C13: from Old French fonder, from Latin fundāre, from fundus bottom British Dictionary definitions for founded (3 of 3) found 3 verb (tr) to cast (a material, such as metal or glass) by melting and pouring into a mould to shape or make (articles) in this way; cast Word Origin for found C14: from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere to melt Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012.

To save this word, you'll need to log in. to be responsible for the creation and early operation or use of John Harvard did not actually found the university that now bears his name begin, constitute, establish, inaugurate, initiate, innovate, institute, introduce, launch, pioneer, plant, set up, start author, father, originate conceive, concoct, contrive, cook (up) create, devise, fabricate, invent, make up, manufacture, produce, think (up) construct, put up develop, enlarge, expand endow, finance, fund, subsidize arrange, organize, systematize, systemize refound, reinitiate, reinstitute, relaunch See the Dictionary Definition  WORD OF THE DAY abusive language or bad repute Get Word of the Day daily email! Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Merriam-Webster unabridged.

Watch Free found guilty. YouTube. Watch free finding graceland. English [ edit] Pronunciation [ edit] enPR: found, IPA ( key. faʊnd/ Rhymes: aʊnd Etymology 1 [ edit] See find. Verb [ edit] found simple past tense and past participle of find Synonyms [ edit] past participle) discovered; repertitious ( by chance or upon advice, obs. ) Derived terms [ edit] found footage lost and found unfound Noun [ edit] found ( uncountable) obsolete) Food and lodging; board. 1872, James De Mille, The Cryptogram ‎ [1] HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2009: I'll only give you the usual payment—say five hundred dollars a year, and found. And—what. Found —that is, board, you know, and clothing, of course, also. Etymology 2 [ edit] From Old French founder (Modern French: fonder) from Latin fundāre. Compare fund. found ( third-person singular simple present founds, present participle founding, simple past and past participle founded. transitive) transitive) To start (an institution or organization. 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad ‎ [2] “ [ …] That woman is stark mad, Lord Stranleigh. Her own father recognised it when he bereft her of all power in the great business he founded. …” ( transitive) To begin building. (Can we add an example for this sense? Conjugation [ edit] to start organization) establish Antonyms [ edit] to begin building) ruin ( to start organization) dissolve, abolish [ edit] foundation founder Translations [ edit] to start an organization Arabic: أَسَّسَ ‎   (ar. ʾassasa) Armenian: հիմնադրել   (hy. himnadrel) ստեղծել   (hy. stełcel) հիմնել   (hy. himnel) Belarusian: ́ў   impf ( zasnóŭvacʹ) ́   pf ( zasnavácʹ) ́   impf ( zakladácʹ) ́ і   pf ( zaklásci) Bulgarian:   (bg. učredjavam)   (bg. sǎzdavam) Catalan: fundar   (ca) Chinese: Mandarin: 設立   (zh) 设立   (zh. shèlì) Czech: založit   (cs) Danish: grundlægge   (da) Dutch: stichten   (nl) Finnish: perustaa   (fi) French: fonder   (fr) Georgian: დაფუძვნება ( dapuʒvneba) German: gründen   (de) Greek: ιδρύω   (el. idrýo) συστήνω   (el. systíno) Italian: fondare   (it) Japanese: 興す ( okosu) 打ち立てる ( uchitateru) 設立する   (ja. setsuritsu suru) Khmer: បង្កើត   (km. bɑŋkaət) Korean: 설립하다   (ko. seolliphada) 수립하다   (ko. suriphada) Latin: fundō Norwegian: grunnlegge Occitan: fondar   (oc) Polish: założyć   (pl) zakładać   (pl) Portuguese: fundar   (pt) Quechua: tiqsiy Romanian: întemeia   (ro) fonda   (ro) Russian: ́   (ru)   impf ( osnóvyvatʹ) ́   (ru)   pf ( osnovátʹ) ́   (ru)   impf ( učreždátʹ) ́   (ru)   pf ( učredítʹ) Scots: foond Scottish Gaelic: stèidhich Slovak: založiť Spanish: fundar   (es) Swedish: grunda   (sv) Turkish: kurmak   (tr) Ukrainian: ́   impf ( zasnóvuvaty) ́   pf ( zasnuváty) ́   impf ( osnóvuvaty) ́   pf ( osnuváty) Volapük: please add this translation if you can to begin building Armenian: հիմքը դնել ( himkʿə dnel) հիմքը գցել   (hy. himkʿə gcʿel) Aromanian: fundedz Bulgarian:   (bg. osnovavam) Mandarin: 成立   (zh. chénglì) 創設   (zh) 创设   (zh. chuàngshè) Georgian: საფუძვლის ჩაყრა ( sapuʒvlis čaq̇ra) დაფუძვნება ( dapuʒvneba) German: errichten   (de) gründen   (de) Greek: θεμελιώνω   (el. themelióno) Japanese: 基礎を築く   (ja. kiso wo kizuku) Korean: 설립하다   (ko. seolliphada) Ngazidja Comorian: utsenga Old English: astemnian, gegrundweallian Polish: budować   (pl) zbudować   (pl) tworzyć   (pl) stworzyć   (pl) Quechua: tiksiy Romanian: funda   (ro) întemeia   (ro) înființa   (ro) Russian: ́   (ru)   impf ( osnóvyvatʹ) ́   (ru)   pf ( osnovátʹ) Swedish: grundlägga   (sv) Turkish: temel atmak   (tr) The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations. Translations to be checked References [ edit] Oxford Online Dictionary, found WordNet 3. 1: A Lexical Database for English, Princeton University Etymology 3 [ edit] Borrowed from Middle French fondre, from Latin fundere. Cognate with Spanish fundir and hundir. To melt, especially of metal in an industrial setting. To form by melting a metal and pouring it into a mould; to cast. (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details? Whereof to found their engines. foundry Etymology 4 [ edit] found ( plural founds) A thin, single-cut file for comb -makers. Anagrams [ edit] fondu.

Watch free movies online the founder. Watch Free founder. Found (The Missing, 1) by Margaret Peterson Haddix Open Preview See a Problem? Wed love your help. Let us know whats wrong with this preview of Found by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Thanks for telling us about the problem. 36, 360 ratings 3, 756 reviews Start your review of Found (The Missing, 1) Aug 19, 2008 Becky rated it it was amazing Haddix, Margaret Peterson. 2008. The Missing Book 1: Found. I may be a bit biased- slightly- since I love, love, love Margaret Peterson Haddix. My expectations were high with this her first book in a new series. And I was NOT disappointed. I was WOWed. I'm not foolish enough to think that this one will WOW every single kid, teen, or adult out there. But for those that love science fiction and one is for you. Here's the opening of the prologue: It wasn't there. Then it was. Later, Haddix, Margaret Peterson. Later, that was how Angela DuPre would describe the airplane- over and over, to one investigator after another- until she was told never to speak of it again. But when she first saw the plane that night, she wasn't thinking about mysteries or secrets. What Angela DuPre witnessed on her first day of the job was indescribably unbelievable. Perplexing. A plane that appeared and disappeared on the runway. A plane that she found minus the pilot and flight attendants. A flight were all thirty-six passengers were babies. Sounds crazy, right? How could an unscheduled plane- a plane that did not show up on any of their radars- land on their runway to begin with? How could it have gotten there without a pilot on board? Why babies? But even more strange was the fact that once the babies were unloaded, and the proper authorities plane vanished into thin air. Angela DuPre witnessed the unbelievable alright. But she wasn't crazy. The Found opens thirteen years later. Our hero is a boy named Jonah. He's got a best friend, Chip, and a slightly younger sister, Katherine. Our book opens with the arrival of several mystery letters. Two letters. Thirteen words. Lives are going to change. "You are one of the missing. and "Beware! They're coming back to get you. Found is a suspenseful, mysterious action-and-adventure novel that will thrill those that love science fiction. Of course I can't promise that it will "thrill" every reader. But I know it kept me reading. I couldn't put it down. And I was loving every minute of it. The pacing was just right. The characters were nicely developed- and are sure to improve upon with each novel that is published in the series. The only problem with the book is that it left me wanting more. wanting more now! I don't want to have to wait for the next novel to come out. I want to know what happens to Jonah and Katherine and Chip NOW! There's this intensity and immediacy that I just don't find in many other books... Sep 07, 2008 Betsy really liked it This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Im a childrens librarian so I get to see a lot of childrens books pass through my hallowed public library doors. Lots. But a person cant see everything so once in a while I like to traipse down to my friendly neighborhood bookstore to see whats on the shelves. I skip into the childrens section, peruse the titles there, skim one or two just to see if Id like to read them later, and thats it. End of story. Normally. This past week-end I skipped in as per usual and skimmed the titles of the Im a childrens librarian so I get to see a lot of childrens books pass through my hallowed public library doors. This past week-end I skipped in as per usual and skimmed the titles of the new fall releases. A new P. E. Kerr. something by F. Higgins. and a new Margaret Peterson Haddix. Now theres a treat! Im not the biggest Haddix fan in the world but Im rather fond of her style. Kids love her Among the Hidden series and Running Out of Time was a fun concept (so much so that perhaps director M. Night Shymalan thought so too. But Ive never really fallen for a Haddix novel, you know? The writing just usually doesnt do it for me. Maybe its the tone or the content or something, but I wasnt really digging the Haddix. Until now. You see, as I sat down in the bookstores café to read a chapter I found myself sucked into the story. Does it contain some lickety split action sequences and leaps that stretch at my adult credulity? Sure. But I also feel that this may be some of Haddixs best work. It doesnt necessarily stand on its own due to its cliffhanger ending, but if you want to hand a kid something fun, fast-paced, and deeply mysterious then this is the book to surrender. Thirteen years ago an airline attendant saw something impossible. When the plane appeared on the tarmac it somehow appeared without anyone realizing it had landed. Stranger still, it contained no pilot, no crew, no adults at all. Just thirty-six babies strapped in their seats. Fast forward to present day when new friends Jonah and Chip check the formers mailbox. There, resting inside is an unsigned note that simply reads, “You are one of the missing. ” A cruel prank? It certainly seems that way until Chip gets the same letter. Then they both get a follow-up that reads “Beware! Theyre coming back to get you. ” They? They who? There doesnt seem to be much rhyme or reason to the notes until Chip discovers that he and Jonah have something in common. They were both adopted. And with the help of Jonahs sister Katherine theres more to discover. Why does an FBI agent have information about the boys birth parents? Why did Katherine see a man appear and disappear in an office one day? Whos been sneaking around Jonahs room, looking through his things? And whats the real story behind that plane? The answers lead the kids to discover their connection to seemingly impossible events. Im a sucker for books that contain anonymous notes. Such letters appear in stories like The Mailbox by Audrey Shafer and you librarians out there will understand what I mean when I say that they make it easy to booktalk titles. I also love mysteries, frightening moments, and plucky protagonists. Actually that final item is a bit odd in this book. Though our hero in this story is clearly Jonah, the boy spends much of the novel with his fingers in his ears going “LALALALALALALA! ” while his friend and sister do much of the investigating on his behalf. Credit where credit is due, though. The kids really do discover a ton of information, and in a way that makes sense to the plot and is plausible. Anytime a kid in a book breaks into a locked room with a hairpin my eyebrows make a break for my hairline and it takes a while to coax them down. No coaxing was required as I read Haddixs novel. My eyebrows remained firmly in place the entire time. Authors today face several conundrums when it comes to writing contemporary realistic (or realistic-ish) fiction. First of all, how are your child characters living in the suburbs getting around? Its not as if a lot of suburban kids take the bus, after all. Like most authors, Haddix goes for the old bike riding solution. The next problem? Cell phones. In the past your characters would find themselves in a perilous situation and be helpless and unable to alert anyone to their location. Cell phones, fortunately, can only work where theres a signal so chalk that up to another problem solved. Its easy to work around contemporary technology, but a good writer should make use of it. If a kid has a phone with camera capabilities, then that should come in handy. And Haddix definitely sees electronic devices as a way to aid and abet the action rather than hinder it. Other authors take note. Sure, technology changes but when it comes to something like cell phone cameras such devices will be around for a while. Might as well make your book believable by utilizing them. Okay. So heres my official SPOILER ALERT warning. If you would like to be surprised by the secret of this book, stop reading this review right now. I liked it. Nuff said. They gone? Great. As those of you who have read the book are aware, the secret behind this story is that the babies on the plane is that theyre all famous children that died sometime in history. The Lindbergh baby. The kids that Richard III slaughtered. Princess Anastasia (and her little bro. People from the future pay big bucks to raise such kids, but we never really learn who Chip and Jonah are. We can probably rule out the children mentioned in the book, so who does that leave? My hope is that Jonah will turn out to be The Dauphin. Thatd be pretty cool, right? As for Chip, why not Henry VIIIs kid, Edward VI? Both are famous in history. Both would yield fascinating speculations. Thats just my two cents. Haddix is certainly not flying by the A Sound of Thunder rules of time travel here, by the way. People can apparently make fairly large changes to the past without worrying about how the ripple affect is going to damage the future. Apparently it isnt until youre plopping babies from the past into the twenty-first century that things start to get messed up. How nice that the universe is so flexible. It certainly should be a load off of time travelers minds, thats for sure. Ive heard some people voice objections to the book in terms of the action sequences. Is it plausible that two kids would be able to make a last minute plan when they both bend down to tie a shoelace? Meh. And as for the fight scenes, maybe they arent the greatest Ive ever encountered but they didnt sufficiently distract me from the rest of the book to keep me from enjoying it. Haddix isnt going to win any major literary awards with this novel, but shell probably garner more than a few kids choice medals and ribbons. And quite frankly, thats the kind of stuff you need to keep in your library. Haddix is a crowd pleaser at heart along the lines of fellow three-namers Mary Downing Hahn or Willo Davis Roberts. But for what its worth, I think she improves as she goes. Found is undoubtedly the book of hers that Ive enjoyed the most. Looking forward to the sequel. Ages 9-14... "Found" is my first review on goodreads. Since a synopsis of the book is available, I'm not going to recap the plot, but simply give my thoughts. I am a fan of Margaret Haddix's work and have read "Running Out of Time" and the Shadow Children series among others which are in the same genre as "Found. However, Haddix's writing spans a range of genres and I recently read "Uprising. which is historical fiction, and it was excellent. I am also a big fan of fantasy/scifi and reading the first book "Found" is my first review on goodreads. I am also a big fan of fantasy/scifi and reading the first book in a new series is always exciting. I get that feeling of starting a new adventure that you really hope is exciting. In the case of "Found. I was not disappointed. Time travel is certainly common in children's books but Haddix puts a fresh twist on it by including time thieves who recklessly steal babies for profit regardless of the consequences to the future and time police who are out to stop the thieves even if it means that the stolen children must go back in time, leave their families, and even die. The children are caught in the middle. Though the idea for the book is exciting, the plot occasionally bogged down, the characters were frustrating at times and two dimensional for the most part, and, having a teenager myself, I often questioned the authenticity of the thoughts and dialogue of the main characters. It also seems clear as to the direction of the series. With that said however, I'll definitely read the second book to find out what happens based on the decision Jonah made at the end of the book... 3. 5 Silver Stars it could be 4 stars, only if I've been more obsessed to the story. it has a great mysterious plot, interesting concept, good thrilling start it was so intriguing I finished it less than 24 hours. made me curious all the way to see what will happen to the characters & why but it was a middle grade (Not regardless of age because the characters acted childish sometimes & at some points the whole plot wasn't attracting me enough) so yeah 3 is good Aug 22, 2008 Anne it was ok Recommends it for: YA SF fans with low expectations Recommended to Anne by: my sister Per the summary: When thirteen-year-old friends Jonah and Chip, who re both adopted, find out that they were discovered on a plane that appeared out of nowhere, full of babies, with no adults on board, they realize that they have uncovered a mystery involving time travel and two opposing forces, each trying to capture them. The first two-thirds of the book were okay - a little dragged out and sometimes frustrating - but the last third of the book, which reveals the time travelers and their Per the summary: When thirteen-year-old friends Jonah and Chip, who re both adopted, find out that they were discovered on a plane that appeared out of nowhere, full of babies, with no adults on board, they realize that they have uncovered a mystery involving time travel and two opposing forces, each trying to capture them. The first two-thirds of the book were okay - a little dragged out and sometimes frustrating - but the last third of the book, which reveals the time travelers and their intentions, was very disappointing. The science doesn't make sense and at several points the author seems to forget that a large group is present - only the main characters do anything. This is the first book in the series. I'm not sure I'll pick up the next one... Sep 25, 2010 Marley I first picked this book thinking, Well I've read a lot, so why not start a new series? I wasn't expecting much, but I was wrong. The plot. So It was running fine but then it took a surprising twist in the middle that just keeps you hooked. I couldn't put it down without thinking, what now? Jonah. He reminds me of, well, me. Super cautious and wanting to live life the same way. Yet he's good at figuring things out. The ending. All I can say is wow. The whole cave thing amazed me. I kept thinking, I first picked this book thinking, Well I've read a lot, so why not start a new series? I wasn't expecting much, but I was wrong. I kept thinking, what are you doing Jonah. And when they teleported to the 15th century, I was speechless. Jonah and Kathrine going with Chip really proved their friendship. Now I wonder, what would have happened if they were to late to grab Chip's arm? Who is Jonah. What happens now... Feb 06, 2009 Michelle Both of my girls are adoped and so I had a connection to this story that was unexpected. Imagine having your adopted child receive a letter that tells them "You are one of the missing" That would freak me out! Well, that is what actually happens in this book. I really enjoyed this book. It was an action packed book. Mar 30, 2011 Sesana This is the first book in the Missing series. I've heard really, really good things about this book, and they're all true. I almost read it in one sitting, not bad for a 300 page book. A plane mysteriously appears at an airport, carrying only 36 babies. No pilot, no crew, no adults at all. As soon as the babies are unloaded, the plane vanishes again. Thirteen years later, Jonah (adopted) and his new friend Chris (also adopted, though he doesn't know it at the beginning of the story) start This is the first book in the Missing series. Thirteen years later, Jonah (adopted) and his new friend Chris (also adopted, though he doesn't know it at the beginning of the story) start getting strange (identical) messages, and begin researching their adoptions to find some strange things. The mystery of who they really are and where they really came from is (mostly) solved by the end of the book, but there's still a lot left to cover. I'll be reading the rest of this series... This book was way better than I remembered reading it a long time ago. The beginning seemed pretty boring but in the middle all the action and conspiracy happened and it good good again. I liked the book but I did not absolutely love it. I will probably read the series because I wonder what happened to the main character and his sister when. happened. Overall, I liked the book and people should read this. Jun 26, 2008 Sam Bloom Extremely quick-moving read, and really enjoyable. This is the first book of hers I've read (I need to read "Among the Hidden. obviously. A plane appears out of nowhere, full of crying babies. and no one else. No pilots, flight attendants, parents. nobody. What a premise! Then, we fast-forward 13 years and meet Jonah, who keeps getting cryptic letters with no return address. The letters are related to the fact that Jonah is adopted, which is related to that weird airplane from the Extremely quick-moving read, and really enjoyable. The letters are related to the fact that Jonah is adopted, which is related to that weird airplane from the beginning of the book. I'll look forward to book 2... I was plopped between two 5th graders in the fiction section of S's and W's with my legs crossed booktalking like an auctioneer. Sigh. Joy. My favorite part of my job. These two youngsters were not put-off by my rapid-fire read-this-read-that spiel. I have to tone it down for most as their eyes cross or their whites show. But not these two. They inhaled the book information interrupting me to chuck in their own opinions. So imagine my double joy when one jumps up and says "just a minute. and I was plopped between two 5th graders in the fiction section of S's and W's with my legs crossed booktalking like an auctioneer. So imagine my double joy when one jumps up and says "just a minute. and runs to another section to return with a book she thrusts in my hands and says, you've gotta read this one. Found is about Jonah, an adopted boy, whose new friend, Chip discovers he's adopted as well. The two begin getting scary letters in the mail about people coming to get them and being "missing. Katherine, Jonah's sister plunges into the mystery headfirst trying to find answers along with Chip as to the background behind their adoptions. Jonah becomes more reluctant as the answers unfold and he isn't so sure he wants to find out the mysteriousness of his adoption. The story unfolds to an exciting climax that will make you want to read book 2. Students like this series that sweeps readers along with gobs of action and creepiness. The writing descriptions are not gorgeous nor is the dialogue witty but it is a quick fun read. I do think Katherine upstages Jonah as the main character. She's such a spunky, gutsy gal with a quick brain and eye for details. She's just a plain 'ole fun character. Jonah sticks his head in the sand until the very end where he is forced to either show some leadership skills or fade into the rocks. Not all the questions are answered in this book. We don't know who Jonah is historically and he isn't really described so the reader can't take a stab at guessing. Well, you can take a stab at it but chances are you'll be wrong. We also don't know what happened to Daniella. It isn't clear Katherine's role in the series either but I think she's an interesting character that has to be in the next book based on how Found ends. A good series for your library. Reading Level 5. 0... Oct 25, 2009 JG (The Introverted Reader) review of another edition Recommended to JG (The Introverted Reader) by: Donna It's very hard to summarize this book without giving anything away. Let's see. Jonah Skidmore was adopted when he was three months old. Just before his thirteenth birthday, he receives a cryptic message in the mail and he starts questioning the little that he knows about his past. Very, very bare bones there. After getting hooked by the fantastic prologue, I had a little bit of an idea as to where this might be going. I was right to an extent, but mostly I was hugely surprised by the time the It's very hard to summarize this book without giving anything away. I was right to an extent, but mostly I was hugely surprised by the time the ending rolled around. I woke up, started this as I ate breakfast, kept reading, and finished it in about three hours. Sure, it's an older kids' book and I'm a pretty fast reader, but I could not put this down. The action and discoveries didn't stop and I just kept frantically turning pages to find out more. Jonah is an engaging character. Not too good, not too bad- just your average seventh-grader. His actions, reactions, and interactions all felt real to me. Even his sister Katherine and his friend Chip are believable and well fleshed-out. I will say that the Skidmore parents felt a little too perfect. Really, there are only two things keeping this from being a five-star book for me. One, it's science fiction and I'm not really a fan of the genre. Two, by the time I got to the ending, I felt like this was mostly set up for the following book(s. There's nothing wrong with that, and there's nothing really wrong with this book, but I feel like there's room for the sequel to be even better and I just want to leave some wiggle room in my ratings. If I were the author, I would feel cheated, but there you go. Four stars. Highly recommended as a surprising page-turner for young teenagers and even those older folks who don't allow the age of a protagonist to keep them from enjoying a great story... Dec 05, 2008 Heather My sister sent me a copy because she LOVED it. So I read it today and I quite liked it. As a mother of an adopted son I must say this book made me a tad uncomfortable - what if someone tried to take him back? NNNOOOOOOO. But it was interesting to read the characters' emotions as they discussed adoption, learned they were adopted or were the sibling of an adopted child. I think the characters were very well done and the emotions and thoughts were true to life. This book is a bit science fictiony. My sister sent me a copy because she LOVED it. This book is a bit science fictiony. You won't like it if you don't like sci fi. The first part of the book was a little slow. The last part was a little too fast. But overall I enjoyed it and would read the second book. I do hate though when a book just ends totally abruptly and right on the edge of a major discovery. I HATE waiting for the next book. I typically like to read a series after it's all written so I don't have to wait. Except for HP, and Leven Thumps, and Fablehaven, and Artemis, I need to shut up. It's geared towards 4th graders on up but I disagree with that most heartily. I don't think this book appropriate until 7th grade or higher. For one, I think younger kids would be bored with the slow start (a lot of it is about feelings) and second, I think it's just subject matter that's a little more grown-up. At first I really liked Jonah's family's relationship but after a while he started getting snippy and rude to his parents. He's never really bad, but it still grated a bit. His friend Chip is from a pretty disfunctional family which could be a good discussion topic. A good, fast, fun read... Found is a book that starts right off with the drama. It is not a lot, but it is enough to get you wondering and thinking. Throughout the book you are left off with surprises and cliff hangers, that makes you want to keep reading. The main character (Johna) is always doubting himself and can never believe what he is hearing or seeing, but as the book goes on he matures and learns how to stick with his decisions and stops trying to find a logical explanation for everything. Overall Found was a Found is a book that starts right off with the drama. Overall Found was a good book that I hope is going to start off a good series... I didn't actually like this book, but as I am pretty sure I would have when I was the target audience, I gave it a 3 stars instead of 2. This book is mostly set-up, but I feel like Haddix is going to do a thing with different eras in time like what Rick Riordan does with mythology, to try to make it more approachable. I could be very wrong but that is the impression I get. I honestly don't really know what to say about the rest of the book. As an adult, it was just kind of boring. I didn't care I didn't actually like this book, but as I am pretty sure I would have when I was the target audience, I gave it a 3 stars instead of 2. I didn't care about the characters or mysteries, I felt no attachment at all. Everything was too convenient and answers were jumped to so rapidly. People who say they have answers just beat about the bush in really awkward ways. There are too many loopholes and discrepancies. Awkward. That's the word I want for this book: it is awkward and clunky. As a child, though, I would not have noticed all of that, would have taken it in stride, and would eagerly pick up the next to find out what happens. How will they fix the 15th century? How will they fix all the centuries so all the kids can stay with their 21st century families and all end up back in the cave and at the conference safe and sound? My younger self would care, but my adult self does not... Jul 14, 2008 Liana liked it Magaret Peterson Haddix has always been an enjoyable author for me. Her books have that edge of realism that makes them so believable, and she has that way of slipping in a thought provoking message about society without being pushy. That's why it's hard for me to believe Found is a Haddix book. It feels so lacking when compared to her other novels. Why is it the character feel so wooden in this novel? It's not like they don't have personality. It's just that they are never more than you expect Magaret Peterson Haddix has always been an enjoyable author for me. It's just that they are never more than you expect them to be. Jonah is always skeptical, Katherine is always sassy, Chip refrains from ever being more than the semiuseless goofball. And it's not that they're complete stereotypes, it's that they are static. I felt no growth from the characters. They behaved exactly like a a bunch of 12/13 year olds would. I kept hoping to get past that outer shell and see some real development, but Haddix seemed content keeping them as shallow cut-outs, mere vessels for the plot. And there lies my biggest gripe with the novel: the plot. It wasn't boring. It had a few plot twists, and I was interested all the way through to the very end. The end also sets itself up for a sequel very well, making you wonder what will happen. But there's no message there. This book was a thrill-ride, and I enjoyed it, but if I ever read the sequel, I'll probably have to reread this book first, because it was so ultimately forgettable. Maybe Haddix will slip in her usual messages about the dangers of playing god or the power goverment has over our lives in the later volumes, but this one didn't have any philosophical undertones. Like the charaters, it never tried to be more than what it was: a summer beach book. Found isn't a bad book; I was simply hoping for more from Ms. Haddix... Jan 14, 2011 Anne Osterlund Jonah is adopted. Which aside from his parents annoying repetition of their “out-of-the-blue” adoption story, isnt that dominant a facet of his life. At least not compared to shooting hoops with his friend, Chip, and trying to be cool enough for seventh grade. And shunning his slightly younger sister, Katherine. But then the letter arrives. “You are one of the missing. ” And the other letter. “Beware! They are coming back for you. ” Followed by the secret lists, intruders, and the phone number from Jonah is adopted. ” Followed by the secret lists, intruders, and the phone number from the FBI. Which all lead back to the plane that disappeared. And suddenly being “adopted” has an entirely different meaning. Yet another series I am going to have to shoot right to the top of my priority list. And I already had so many... Sep 13, 2010 Tiffany Neal I really, really liked this book. The prologue (even though I normally am not a fan of them) was an amazing start to the book that kept me reading to find out what in the world was going to happen next. I have a lot of students who are huge fans of Margaret Peterson Haddix from reading the Among the Hidden series who will love this book/series. The only (weak) reason why I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 is because I am not completely sure if I'll be picking up the next book any time soon. It's not I really, really liked this book. It's not that it doesn't seem interesting, it's just that I have so many books to read and I don't know if I have the time to stick with another series like this. The book was great though... Jan 31, 2014 Kayla Edwards This is an amazing children's series! The mystery is so good, it have many of the teachers at my school hooked on these books. Hey, when a storyline is good and well executed, it doesn't matter how old you are. A good book is a good book! Looking forward to checking out the other installments: Wow wow wow. Heart stopping action, page turning suspense and things that will keep you up all hours of the night and freak you out. True. But this book is so amazing but a lil crazy which lowered the rating Wow wow wow. But this book is so amazing but a lil crazy which lowered the rating 😂... Wow, this book was insane. It was super slow for the majority of it, but it got so action-packed at the end. If you read this and are wondering if its worth it to push through the slow part to get to the end, you definitely should because the explosive ending made it so worth it. I definitely think this was a little bit of a filler book, but its also super necessary because it really explains what the hell is going on without it feeling like an info dump. This book was super suspenseful, and the Wow, this book was insane. This book was super suspenseful, and the ending was insanity, but the main point of this book, I think, was to set up for the second book. I think the pace is going to pick up so much in the next book, there is going to be so much more action, and it is just going to be crazy town. While I couldn't really connect to the characters because they are so young compared to me, I think they were relatively well-fleshed out. I think we will really get to know them more as the series goes on, but overall, I never felt like they were flat or static characters. They definitely grew and developed over the course of the book, which I really appreciated. I also appreciated the fact that there was no love in this story. Don't get me wrong. I love me a good love story, but it's so refreshing sometimes to just read a book without one, and this definitely did not need one, not just because of their age but also because it honestly would have felt out of place given the circumstances of the plot and everything that happens. So I really liked that it was definitely more about friendship and family than any kind of romantic relationships. Overall, I really loved the characters and the writing and plot and world, and I am so excited to read the next book. It is going to be epic, I can already tell. I highly recommend you check out this series because it is just so fantastic... Feb 28, 2017 Gus Personal Response This book was very good. The plot in the book had a lot of action to it and was very exciting to read. The science fiction in the book was very interesting and had many interesting theories. I thought that the element of time travel in the book made anything possible during the reading of the book. Plot Jonah Skidmore was adopted at a very young age. He had no memory of his past and it didn't bother him one bit. Jonah started to receive strange letters in the mail that seemed to Personal Response This book was very good. Jonah started to receive strange letters in the mail that seemed to involve his past. Jonah and his family decided to ask for more information about Jonah's adoption, but only hit dead ends. Jonah and his friend Chip dug a little deeper and found out that Chip was also adopted. The two friends and Jonah's little sister started to search for answers and were left with one possible lead. They met a woman at the local library and learned that Jonah was one of multiple babies who were found on a mysterious plane. The babies were separated and adopted by normal couples around the United States. They also found out that someone is bringing all of those same babies to the same town. The three attended a seminar for adopted children and participated in a hike around the center. The group of kids from the plane were separated from the others and were led to a cave. While in the cave, the kids learned they are all missing children from the future sent to their current time by the use of time travel. A time agent from the future arrived and told the kids that each of them would be sent back to their original time. Jonah and his sister were transported back into time with Chip and were lost in the past. Characterization Jonah was an average teenage boy until the letters started to arrive. He started to become more curious about his past and his adoption. He became very interested in the history of his surroundings and the people who surround him. When he learned that he was from the past, he started to doubt and question who he really was. He was sent back into time with a very confused and trouble mental state. Impact of Setting/Time The setting of the story was in a small town in Ohio. The small town made some events in the book very major to the characters. The adopted child conference was made more suspicious by the fact that it was held in a very small town. The setting of a small town also added an aspect of comfortability to Jonah and the people around him. The arrival of the letters made Jonah very uncomfortable and it caused him to search for answers. The time period of the book was set in modern day America. The clues towards this were the technology present throughout the book. Smart phones, televisions, and other appliances gave the clues that this book was in the modern day. Thematic Connection I think that the theme throughout this book was things may not always be what they seem. Jonah thought that he was just a normal teenage boy living in Ohio. When Jonah started to receive the letters, it made him question how normal he really was. The letters arriving at Chip's also changed who he thought he was. Jonah and Chip both learned that they are more different than they ever thought possible. The two learned that they will never be normal until they are sent to their original times. Rating/Recommendation This book was very rewarding of all five stars. The exciting plot and multiple twists throughout the book made it very exciting to read. The multiple aspects of time travel also were what earned it five stars. This book was great for anybody who loves to read about science fiction and other aspects of the supernatural. The multiple characters of both genders also made the book great for both male and female readers. This book is great for anybody from middle school up based on the fact that it isn't an overly complex book to read... I read this on my Kindle and got through it quicker than I thought I would. It was a fun read! It's a YA for middle school age. I found it enjoyable and sometimes laugh out loud funny with the kids carrying on the way they did. I like the attitude that Jonah had about his adoption status and found it refreshing. I can definitely see reading more from this author and this series. I'd like to know how it eventually ends. I felt the story flowed well and was easy to follow along with. I don't own a I read this on my Kindle and got through it quicker than I thought I would. I don't own a physical copy of this book but from what I see for the Kindle version cover it's really cool looking! Rating: PG (only because of some low key violence toward the end) Language: no profanity or use of deity in a negative way Recommend: Yes... Feb 10, 2018 Ellen I generally don't like books that deal with time travel because I find the plot to be convoluted and the logic of the time travel rules confusing. But I liked the characters in this one and it was more about figuring out was going on even though it did have a moment of confusing time travel related rules, I ended up enjoying it overall. I'm not sure how I'll like the next one in the series since it deals more with time travel but I'll check it out. 2018 challenge: a book about time travel This book is definitely written for kids. My two kids that read it really liked it! As for me, I thought it was a creative, interesting plot that really only got started after a couple hundred pages. It was almost like it was an intro to the series, and nothing was resolved at the end. It lacked depth, but it was also entertaining and a quick read. Sep 09, 2014 Craig Butler * spoiler alert. Do you like books that keep you turning the page? If you do this is the book for you because at the end of every chapter you would want to read the genre of this book is scientific my opinion this one of the best books in the world and it is even better because this book is the first book in a series called "The Missing Books. The setting for the book "Found" is in a normal neighborhood that starts to get creepy because Jonah starts to get creepy letters * spoiler alert. Do you like books that keep you turning the page? If you do this is the book for you because at the end of every chapter you would want to read the genre of this book is scientific my opinion this one of the best books in the world and it is even better because this book is the first book in a series called "The Missing Books. The setting for the book "Found" is in a normal neighborhood that starts to get creepy because Jonah starts to get creepy letters from an unknown person in the 21st century. Jonah wanted to just be an ordinary kid who was adopted but he starts getting these weird letters from an unknown person that says "you are one of the missing" later on he finds out that his best friend Chip is also adopted so they both try to find our where they came and why they got those weird they go to the library to meet the flight attendant that was on the plane to see what was this whole mystery was about. Then they find out that they were one of the babies that they were on a plane full of babies at the beginning of the story. Later on they find out that two people want to capture them and take them somewhere. At the end of the book Jonah and Chip have to make a choice to go to the future or go to the past because they did not come from the 21st century. I liked the way the author always keeps you turning the page because she knows how to always make the book interesting in every chapter. In every chapter such as Chapter 9 when Jonah and Chip get another weird letter that says "Beware, there coming back to get you" is one of the chapters that makes you want to read the other chapter. This book makes you want to read more because in the book the chapters always end in suspicion. "Found" is a good title for the book because Jonah and Chip were found by a unknown person and they need to go back where they came from. Jonah and Chip were found by the people who had took them into the 21st century. These people wanted to take them to the future to finish their mission. According to the text these people had accidentally put them in the 21st century and it took them 13 years to finally find them and take them to the future. I understood why Jonah and Chip didn't want to go to the future or the past because they wouldn't remember anything that happened to them. When Chip and Jonah and the other babies that were on the plane were stuck in a cave they all had to make a decision to go to the future or the past. Since the 21st century kids are kind of spoiled they didn't want to go to the past or the future to save time. A theme of this book is choices and possibilities because Jonah has to make a choice to go to the future or the past. I chose this theme because Jonah and Chip have to make a choice and think of the possibilities to go to the future or the past. If they go to the future they would forget everything and may be treated wrong. If they go to the past they would also forget everything and there might be a Bubonic Plague or a war that can kill them. I give this book 5 stars because the book never gets boring and it is always interesting. I would recommend this book to anyone who like mystery books that keeps you turning the page. So for anybody who doesn't like reading books try this one because it is very interesting in every chapter in the story... Oct 16, 2011 Taylor Litson Thirteen years ago there was an undefined airplane that had landed at Sky Trails Airport. When the plane was boarded the plane was full of babies, but when the people had taken all of the babies off of the plane, it vanished. Now it has been thirteen years and Jonah and Chip know they are adopted. They set out to search for the other 34 babies, with some help from Jonah's sister Katherine. After a while of searching for these kids that are now in there teens they meet a woman named Angela Thirteen years ago there was an undefined airplane that had landed at Sky Trails Airport. After a while of searching for these kids that are now in there teens they meet a woman named Angela Dupree. This was the woman who worked at Sky Trails at the time of the incident. She tells Jonah, Katherine, and Chip all about what happened that day at Sky Trails Airport. Angela Dupree leads them into a huge mess with all of the babies and the children have to choose there destiny by going in the past or future. These kids ran into very many problems that they never knew the anser to, so they went with what their hearts told them to do. My favorite character of this book is definitely Jonah because he is always trying to make thing right and he also never gives up no matter how hard the task or decision is that he has to make. The one character I could relate to in this book is Jonah. The reason I can relate to this person is because he is very kind hearted and wants the best for all people. Also Jonah is always taking charge when one of his friends doesn't want to do something, and let me tell you I have to do that a lot. Some of the feelings that I can share with some of the characters in this book is that I feel sad or scared when I did something that I knew I shouldn't have done. There are may ways to relate to this book because it seems so realistic and that is what allows me to express my feelings about this book. This was a really thrilling book and I would definitely read this again if I could. My favorite part of this book is when Jonah, Chip, and Katherine are learning about the children that were on the plane, and how they learn that all of the kids that were on the plane thirteen years ago all live in the same state. My least favorite part of the book is when Jonah, Chip, and Katherine all go to the meeting of all the adopted children that were on the plane thirteen years ago. The one thing I would change about this book is that I would make it so Katherine never went to the meeting of the adopted children, the reason I say this is because she lies and says she is one of the adopted. I would recommend this book to another person because it is full of action and it is an amazing book. Every time you stop reading this book you feel like you are hanging from the edge of the cliff because you want to know what is going to happen next. Honestly I think anyone who likes to read would like this book because it's just an all around book that keeps you reading at all times. Overall this was a fantastic book that I really enjoyed and I hope whoever decides to read it likes it too... Wow that book had me looking over my shoulder into the darkness behind my chair last night. Let me tell you all something. DON'T EVER READ THAT BOOK IN DARKNESS. It gave me the creeps, and what's worse I had to finish it last night too. Any ways. basically it's a super good read for those who like time travel, mysterious happenings, and some really good action. I enjoyed it very much and now I'm wondering how Jonah, Katherine, Chip, and Alex are going to survive the next book. Wow that book had me looking over my shoulder into the darkness behind my chair last night. I enjoyed it very much and now I'm wondering how Jonah, Katherine, Chip, and Alex are going to survive the next book. And. I'm. Gonna. need to go back to the library. sighs... Margaret Peterson Haddix grew up on a farm near Washington Court House, Ohio. She graduated from Miami University (of Ohio) with degrees in English/journalism, English/creative writing and history. Before her first book was published, she worked as a newspaper copy editor in Fort Wayne, Indiana; a newspaper reporter in Indianapolis; and a community college instructor and freelance writer in Margaret Peterson Haddix grew up on a farm near Washington Court House, Ohio. Before her first book was published, she worked as a newspaper copy editor in Fort Wayne, Indiana; a newspaper reporter in Indianapolis; and a community college instructor and freelance writer in Danville, Illinois. She has since written more than 25 books for kids and teens, including Running Out of Time; Dont You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dunphrey; Leaving Fishers; Just Ella; Turnabout; Takeoffs and Landings; The Girl with 500 Middle Names; Because of Anya; Escape from Memory; Say What. The House on the Gulf; Double Identity; Dexter the Tough; Uprising; Palace of Mirrors; Claim to Fame; the Shadow Children series; and the Missing series. She also wrote Into the Gauntlet, the tenth book in the 39 Clues series. Her books have been honored with New York Times bestseller status, the International Reading Associations Childrens Book Award; American Library Association Best Book and Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers notations; and more than a dozen state readers choice awards. Haddix and her husband, Doug, now live in Columbus, Ohio, with their two children... Other books in the series “Ah, jeez. She really is a cheerleader. And it seemed suddenly that this was true- not because she was an airhead or a hottie or a nonjock, but because she could throw herself so wholeheartedly into someone else's cause, because she could care so much and try so hard from the sidelines. ” — 9 likes More quotes… Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

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